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Islay

The Isle of Islay, on the West coast of Scotland, near the Mull of Kintyre (where Campbeltown is situated) represents a special trend in the whisky word.
The island is very small, beautifully, with very kind inhabitants.
A whisky produced on Islay is very easy to recognize. It does not happen that often that such a small area produces such a typical and extraordinary spirit.
To go to Islay, a ferry takes about 2 hours to cross the sea. There are 8 distilleries on the Isle. The "capital" is Port Ellen, according to some people, but could also be Bowmore, according to others. Situated south of Isle of Jura, Islay is a unique area in the world of Whisky. The sea spray is typical, and a quarter of its surface is covered by peat bogs. The island is covered by fertile soils, and is more sunny than the average of Scotland. It's ideal for producing barley. The distilleries are adapted to the typical climatic conditions. Peat is used for drying the malt.

 The whisky produced by the four distilleries in the south of the Island (, , and -mothballed since 1983) is influenced by the environing sea. and , two of the other distilleries from the island, produce a less peaty whisky, but with its own personality.

The two last distilleries, Bunnahabhainand Bruichladdichdecided to produce an elegant whisky without too much peaty hints. Bruichladdich started production again in may 2001, and produces since a short time another (very peaty) malt, called Port Charlotte, named after the city near the distillery.Islay produces such typical whiskies, that it is considered as a production area on its own. Islay whiskies are generally smoky, due to the peat used for drying the malt.



 

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